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Online Bachelor of Science in Interpretation Studies in ASL-English Degree

Advance your career in the exciting field of ASL

Obtaining your degree through the William Woods University online degree completion program opens the door to advancement within a challenging, rewarding and growing field. The National Interpreter Education Center has documented a nationwide shortage of qualified interpreters, and the demand is growing every year.  Earning a bachelor’s degree as a working ASL-English Interpreter offers advancement opportunities in the areas of national and statewide certification.

Few institutions compete with William Woods in ASL related programs. Frequently ranked among the top ASL locations in the nation, we offer a unique combination of academic excellence, affordability, and community.

This program is most beneficial for:

  • Working interpreters holding a valid RID, NIC, or BEI Interpreting Certificate but want to complete a bachelor level degree.
  • Students who have completed an Associate degree in an interpreting preparation program and who have completed the necessary admission requirements but are not yet working in the field.

Students complete program courses primarily in a cohort model, developing a learning community of support. The connection between faculty in the online and on-campus programs provides a consistency of content and academic rigor. Campus faculty are involved in developing the curriculum for and teaching the courses offered in the online program. We combine rigorous coursework with a student-centered, service-oriented educational environment, and our convenient 8-week courses offer start-and-stop flexibility and affordable tuition.

Your ASL degree at work

Upon completing this online degree, you will be eligible to sit for National Interpreter Certification (NIC) administered by the Center for the Assessment of Sign Language Interpretation (CASLI). You will gain a greater understanding of Deaf culture, learn interpreting essentials for medical, mental health, legal and other specialties, and obtain the skills necessary to work as an interpreter in a wide variety of environments and professional settings.

Requirements/Curriculum

Courses you may take

ASL 316 - Linguistics Non-Manual Mrkrs in ASL - 3.00

This course is designed to develop proficiency in the understanding and use of non-manual markers in ASL. Many grammatical structures of ASL are produced as facial expressions, body shifts, and morphemes produced with specific mouth and eye movements. For non-Deaf people, this is perhaps some of the more difficult aspects of ASL to learn and the most important for comprehension and production. Students will learn how to accurately inflect specific meaning in ASL using non-manual markers. The course will also touch on fingerspelling accuracy. Prerequisite: ASL 205

ASL 425 - Linguistics of American Sign Lang - 3.00

Students take an analytical approach to language and the field of linguistics as it applies to American Sign Language. ASL phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, bilingualism, and language use and usage will be examined and discussed. Language samples will be viewed and analyzed for evidence of different language structures and forms. Students will also read and critique research articles pertaining to ASL and other signed languages. Prerequisite: ASL245

ASL 430 - ASL Literature - 3.00

This course analyzes and compares the various genres of American Sign Language literature. ASL poetry, narrative, humor, as well as written work by deaf individuals and other language devices will be examined and discussed. Students will create and evaluate original work illustrating the similarities and uniqueness of ASL. Students will become familiar with well-known contributors: Clayton Valli, Patrick Graybill, Ella Mae Lentz, etc. Research articles pertaining to ASL or Deaf Literature will be critiqued and discussed as well. Prerequisite - ASL245

ITP 211 - Theory of Interpretation - 3.00

This course covers the fundamentals of ASL English interpretation and introduces the sociolinguistic factors that influence communication, strategies for analyzing discourse, and the theory and process of mediating between two languages and cultures. The textbook and lectures will cover theories of communication and models of the interpretation processes, the role, boundaries, and responsibilities of the interpreter and other pertinent issues critical to the field. The primary focus of this course is to develop specific skills necessary for the art of interpreting along with ways to analyze the interpreted work. Prerequisite: ASL145

ITP 251 - Ethics in Interpreting - 3.00

This course surveys the field of ethics and how we use ethics and values to make decisions in the face of conflicting values. Ethical standards and dilemmas in various professions, including ASL English interpreting, will be explored through discussion, case studies, and role playing. This course includes topics related to working cross- culturally, power relations within and among groups, and ethical standards and statements from a variety of professions and communities.

ITP 302 - Interpreting Applicatn and Analysis - 3.00

Focuses on creating culturally and linguistically dynamic interpretations between ASL and English. Most interpretations will be of unrehearsed source material. There is an emphasis on increasing individual skill throughout the duration of the course. Students will conduct self and peer diagnostics and provide feedback on interpretations to each other. Prerequisite: ITP 211

ITP 310 - Interpreting in Advanced Settings I - 3.00

An upper level course covering various advanced settings of interpreting. This course covers interpreting in medical, mental health, and educational settings. ASL and English vocabulary in specialized areas not covered in previous courses is developed. Students will be interpreting linguistically dense texts and learning how to manage the various settings and personnel involved in these types of interpreting. Teaming with a Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI) will also be covered. Prerequisites: ITP 351 or ITP 302 with a grade of “C” or higher

ITP 410 - Interpreting in Advanced Setting II - 3.00

An upper level course covering various advanced settings of interpreting. This course covers interpreting legal information, VRS/VRI work, religious settings, and intepreting for deafblind individuals. ASL and English vocabulary in specialized areas, including explicit language, not covered in previous courses is developed. Students will be interpreting linguistically dense texts and learning how to manage the various settings and personnel involved in these types of situations. Prerequisites: ITP 351 or ITP 302 with a grade of “C” or higher

ITP 450 - Senior Capstone - 3.00

This course is the capstone to the major and prepares students to enter the ASL English interpreting profession as a general practitioner. Students will investigate current issues facing the field, prepare for written certification exam(s), career development, and ethical decision making. This course is conducted in seminar format where students will apply demand-control schema, time-management, business practices, code of professional conduct and ethical decision-making, certification and quality assurance, accountability, and life-long learning and professional development. Emphasis given to creating a portfolio and resume for internship and future employment. Prerequisites: ITP 302 or 351 with a grade of “C” or better

ITP 451 - Field Practicum I - 3.00

This course requires a minimum of 150 clock hours in an approved work situation. Students will submit a log of work activities with dates and times illustrating internship activities and outcomes with brief explanatory texts. Students will complete an essay evaluating the role of the on-site supervisor, the quality of the work environment, and the importance of internship experiences. Requires permission of division chair. Prerequisite: ITP450 with grade of 'C' or higher

ITP 452 - Field Practicum II - 3.00

This course requires a minimum of 150 clock hours in an approved work situation. Students will submit a log of work activities with dates and times illustrating internship activities and outcomes with brief explanatory texts. Students will complete an essay evaluating the role of the on-site supervisor, the quality of the work environment, and the importance of internship experiences. Requires permission of division chair. Prerequisite: ITP450 with grade of 'C' or higher

Curriculum

Requirements

  • Completed application
  • Hold an associates-level degree in an interpreting preparation program which includes successful completion of ASL 1-4 and Interpreting 1 and 2 at minimum OR hold current certification or ASLPI score of 2.0 or higher with relevant experience in the field of interpreting 
  • Have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher before starting program

 

Alternative Admission Information 

Applications who hold the following approved certifications may be considered for admission providing the applicant meets the minimum GPA requirement and has relevant work experience. Applicants must submit documentation of such certifications for formal review. 

Your digital classroom. Available anywhere.

William Woods online undergraduate programs are available to students across the country. From our main campus in Fulton, Missouri and beyond, our online graduates hail from California, Illinois, Kansas, Washington, Arkansas and many more.

One more thing

Compensation research firm PayScale recently ranked ASL Interpreting as the 5th most meaningful career. It’s truly an opportunity to flourish and do well by doing good.


Admissions Information

Learn more about online admissions requirements, deadlines, tuition and financial aid available to you.

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