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5
the Hoot
Important Events in Black History
Frederick Douglass
launches his abolitionist
newspaper.
President Lincoln issues the Emancipation
Proclamation, declaring “that all persons
held as slaves”within the Confederate
states “are, and henceforward shall be free.”
Harriet Tubman escapes from slavery
and becomes one of the most effective
and celebrated leaders of the
Underground Railroad.
The Thirteenth Amendment to the
Constitution is ratified, prohibiting slavery.
The Fifteenth Amendment to the
Constitution is ratified, giving blacks
the right to vote.
The National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People is
founded in New York by prominent
black and white intellectuals and led
by W.E.B. Du Bois.
Jackie Robinson breaks Major
League Baseball’s color barrier
when he is signed to the Brooklyn
Dodgers by Branch Rickey.
1846
1849
1863
1865
1870
1909
1947
Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kan., declares
that racial segregation in schools is unconstitutional.
President Johnson appoints Thurgood
Marshall to the Supreme Court. He becomes
the first black Supreme Court Justice.
President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act, the most
sweeping civil rights legislation since Reconstruction. It
prohibits discrimination of all kinds based on race, color,
religion, or national origin.
The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom is
attended by about 250,000 people, the largest
demonstration ever seen in the nation’s capital. Martin
Luther King delivers his famous “I Have a Dream” speech.
The march builds momentum for civil rights legislation.
Rosa Parks refuses to give up her seat at the front of
the “colored section” of a bus to a white passenger.
Barack Obama, Democrat
from Chicago, becomes the
first African-American
president and the country’s
44th president.
1952
1967
2009
1965
1954
1955
1963
1964
Malcolm X becomes a minister of the Nation of
Islam. A black nationalist and separatist
movement, the Nation of Islam contends that
only blacks can resolve the problems of blacks.
“Bloody Sunday”