Page 10 - issue_3

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By Dani Moritz, editor-in-chief
Photos by Ellen Robb
10
the Hoot
Jane* and Sue* share the same major, but otherwise they are quite different.
Jane is a carefree, bubbly, fun-loving girl who has a knack for showing up late.
She’s the kind of person who likes to kick back, relax, order some pizza and
enjoy romantic comedies in the comfort of her own home.
Sue shows up 15 minutes early to everything and has her day’s agenda
planned weeks in advance. However, when she’s not working or planning her
day, she is out socializing, trying new things and being spontaneous.
Together, these two young women balance each other out and make for one
fascinating couple.
They met two years ago and instantly became best friends. Sue even ended up
joining the same sorority as Jane.
“We were best friends,” said Sue. “We would hang out, talk about guys and
just talk about what friends would talk about.”
Their friendship grew and evolved into a romantic relationship.
They did not even discuss the unforeseen chain of events until a month
later. And interestingly enough, neither of the two women had a same-sex
relationship before. In fact, they have differing beliefs as to the origins of their
feelings for each other.
Jane feels that, for the most part, people are born gay.
Sue, however, feels that being gay may have more to do with her
life experiences.
“Throughout my life, every singlerelationship I remember with guys and girls
ended with divorce,” she said. “I think that
is kind of what did it.”
But, regardless of the origins of their
feelings, Jane and Sue would have to
break the news to the people around
them, which went relatively well.
“Overall, on campus, everyone has been
really great about it,” said Jane. “I’ve
never really felt uncomfortable hold-
ing hands with her or anything like
that.”
Sue added, “Even our
professors [have been accept-
ing]. All the professors know,
and even with our club advisers
I’ve never felt uncomfortable.”
Although it took some getting
used to for everyone, most of their family members have been accepting as
well.
“They’ve been, overall, supportive even if they weren’t really comfortable with
it,” said Jane.
Now, over a year since their romantic relationship officially began, Jane and
Sue continue to date, be best friends and enjoy each other’s company.
They enjoy the usual college-student activities. Going to the Ragtag Cinema
in Columbia, finding random restaurants to eat at, watching movies at their
sorority house and being active on campus rank among their favorites.
They even have quirks. Though their opposing personalities help balance
them out, their differences can also add fuel to the fire, especially when it
comes to timeliness.
“I like to be 15 minutes early to everything,” said Sue. “I like to have a
schedule. I like to know how my day is planned out and have gaps in case
things run over. I like to know what’s going to happen the next week ... I like
to be on time.”
This does not always work because Jane does things a little differently.
“It’s not that I don’t like to be on time, I just always find ways to be late,”
she said.
To lessen the issues that come with relationships, they have opted not to be
roommates so they can have adequate alone time.
All in all, they really are not any different from any other couple which is why
they have a hard time understanding why they have limited rights as
a couple.
“I just don’t understand how gay people getting mar-
ried is hurting anyone,” said Sue.
However, they do think that times are changing,
and people are becoming more accepting.
“I think that we will see improvements at some
point and I think it will be really exciting when it
does happen,” said Jane.
But, for now, Sue and Jane will simply con-
tinue their day-to-day activities on campus
and hope for a brighter future so that they
can live their lives just like everyone else.
*Editor’s note:
To protect our sources
from discrimination in the workplace
(which is still legal in many places), we
have decided to conceal our sources’
identities. Jane and Sue are false names
used to represent two very real women on
campus.
Jane* and Sue*