Dual Credit, AP, IB Survey

All admitted students must submit this form prior to registering for classes.

Dear Student:

Completion of this form does not guarantee credit for courses and/or exam taken. To earn dual transfer AP or IB credit you must also fulfill the requirements stated in each section. This form is intended to assist in placing you in the appropriate classes your first semester at William Woods University. If appropriate documentation (as described below) is not be provided your schedule may be adjusted accordingly.

 

1. Basic Information
  1. A value is required.
2. Dual Transfer Credit
  1. Courses which you took either at a college or university or at your high school but had an arrangement (which often included tuition paid to that institution) with a college or university to earn college credit for the course. In order to be granted transfer credit by William Woods University for any course taken you must have an original transcript from the college or university (s) which granted the credit (your high school transcript will not work) sent directly to the registrar’s office at WWU.

  2. Please check the course description which is the most similar the course you took/are currently taking.


  3. An exploration of basic media and art concepts from both an historic and contemporary perspective for non-majors.

  4. Treats major topics in the arts for non-majors with an emphasis on techniques of artistic production, analysis of form and content, an historical perspective, and a critical study of artistic perception.


  5. Introduces students to basic expressive and receptive skills in ASL, including conversation strategies, spatial referencing and facial expressions. Awareness of deaf culture also is included. Attendance in lab is required.

  6. Continues to develop basic expressive and receptive skills including classifiers, temporal sequencing, spatial agreement and object identification through description. Study of deaf culture is continued. Attendance in lab is required.

  7. Survey for non-majors introduces some of the most significant concepts in the study of the biological sciences, including human/environmental interactions, impact of new DNA biotechnology on society, health issues, and some plant and animal systems.

  8. This course is an introduction to the concepts and principles of environmental science. By its nature, environmental science is an interdisciplinary field which draws on elements of the natural sciences, including biology, ecology, chemistry, geography and the earth sciences. Its central theme is the interrelatedness of basic environmental processes in association with conserving important aspects of the environment such as clean air, clean water, pristine habitats and native species. Human population growth, ethics, the law and policy making will be considered in addressing environmental issues.

  9. Designed to introduce the student to the area of oral communication with exercises covering the various phases.

  10. The study of the economy as a whole and provides an overview of how society addresses the basic needs of the economic system. Topics include aggregate demand and supply, business cycles, inflation, unemployment, money and banking, fiscal policy, monetary policy, economic growth, and international trade.

  11. An introduction to the principles and theories of economics with special attention to fundamental economic concepts, business organization, exchange, price determination under various market conditions, distribution of income, agriculture, labor, and role of government in business. The importance of microeconomic theory to international trade is presented.

  12. Students learn to summarize and critique the ideas, theories, and arguments found in college level academic and non-academic articles. Basic research skills and critical thinking skills are also components of the course. Furthermore, the student will recognize the ways in which plagiarism may be prevented through appropriate and accurate documentation of source material.

  13. Students learn how to draft, revise, and edit multiple-source papers that have reflective analysis, sound argumentation, clear organization, well developed paragraphs, and correct sentences. Furthermore, students will recognize the ways in which plagiarism may be prevented through appropriate and accurate documentation of source material.

  14. An introduction to some of the masterpieces of world literature through the Renaissance. All works will be read in English. Writers who have been studied include Homer, Sophocles, Wang Wei, Murasaki Shikabu, Dante, Mirabai, and Cervantes.

  15. An introduction to some of the masterpieces of world literature since the Renaissance. All works will be read in English. Writers who have been studied include Voltaire, Goethe, Ibsen, Yukio Mishima, and Soyinka.

  16. A survey of English literature from Old English to the Romantic Period with emphasis on reading, interpretation, and criticism of representative works of major authors, including Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Swift, and Johnson.

  17. A survey of English literature from the Romantic Period to the present with emphasis on reading, interpretation, and criticism of representative works of major authors, including Keats, Shelly, Wordsworth, Tennyson, Arnold, Yeats, Eliot, Joyce, and Woolf.

  18. Students are introduced to the major genres of literature (fiction, poetry, and drama), as well as their attendant forms, conventions, and contexts. Students are also introduced to techniques for interpreting, analyzing, and commenting on literature, using the vocabulary of literary studies.

  19. A survey of American literature to 1860 with emphasis on reading, interpretation, and criticism of representative works of major authors.

  20. A survey of American literature to 1860 to present with emphasis on reading, interpretation, and criticism of representative works of major authors.


  21. An introductory survey of the world's geographical regions, focusing on essential characteristics and major problems of the more developed regions, including Europe, the region of the former Soviet Union, Australia, Anglo-America, and Japan.

  22. A continuation of GEO 201, focusing on essential characteristics and major problems of the less developed regions including Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America.

  23. An interpretive survey of the major social, political, intellectual and cultural developments of the world from the ancient era through the fifteenth century. Attention is given to such topics as the conflict between religion and politics, the role of religion in cultural development, and the interplay between community and individual rights and responsibilities.

  24. A continuation of HIS 101 stressing the political, social, cultural, and intellectual developments of major world civilizations from 1500 to the present. Special attention is given to the intellectual and industrial revolutions, the rise of science, capitalism and socialism. A student may take this course without having HIS 101.

  25. A survey of American history from the beginnings of colonization through the Civil War.

  26. A survey of American history from the end of the Civil War to the present. A student may take this course without having HIS 103


  27. An introduction to the field of political science, including a review of political institutions, political action, theory and practice. The American system of Government will be emphasized.

  28. An introduction to discrete mathematics. Focus on applications in economics, political science, decision theory, and biology. Specific topics typically include: voting systems, fair division, circuits and scheduling, exponential growth, fractal geometry, elementary probability and statistics.

  29. A pre-calculus introduction to statistics. Topics include: elementary probability, measures of central tendency and variation, normal distributions, sampling, confidence intervals, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation. Emphasis on the use of graphing calculators and the utility of mathematics as a problem-solving tool. Extensive discussion of applications in natural science, social science, and business.

  30. A pre-calculus approach to algebra. Emphasis on the use of graphing calculators and the utility of algebra or modeling language for solving real-life problems.

  31. An introduction to the concepts of limits, continuity, differentiation of elementary functions, definite and indefinite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem. Emphasis on use of graphing calculators and the utility of mathematics as a problem-solving tool. Extensive discussion of applications in natural science, social science, and business.


  32. The introduction of fundamentals in music reading, including treble and bass clef, signatures, scales, time signatures and rhythm in conjunction with interval singing and aural identification.

  33. An introduction to the elements of music and the use of these elements in various musical styles including masterpieces of Western music, popular and folk music, as well as music of other cultures.


  34. A study of the origins, development, and principal doctrines of the major living religions of the world. Primary focus is on : Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

  35. An introduction to psychology as a scientific discipline surveying the biological basis of behavior, motivation, learning, sensation, perception, memory, thinking and language.

  36. An introduction to psychology as a scientific discipline surveying interpersonal behavior, personality development, intelligence, psychopathology, assessment, treatment, and research methodology.


  37. An overview of the sociological perspective. The course emphasizes and understanding of everyday social reality and develops the student's ability to use sociological concepts to interpret social situations and social change. Concepts of culture, socialization, stratification, family, collective behavior, minority relations, and deviance are introduced to the students. The course is taught from an international perspective.

  38. A historical overview of performing arts including discussions of the organization, responsibilities and importance of the creative artists in dance, music, and theatre.

3. Advanced Placement Exams

    If you have taken or plan to take an AP exam please indicate the exam area below. If you have already taken the exam and have earned a score, please fill in the score. In order to obtain college credit for an AP exam score you must have the official scores sent directly to the WWU registrar’s office. There is also a fee of $75 per credit hour to transcript AP credit (no fee if you do not earn a high enough score for credit). This means a typical 3 credit hour class earned though AP credit will cost $225 in transcript fees.

    Exam Have Completed Score Will Complete
4. International Baccalaureate

    If you have taken or plan to take an IB exam please indicate the exam area below. If you have already taken the exam and have earned a score, please fill in the score. In order to obtain college credit for an IB exam score you must have the official scores sent directly to the WWU registrar’s office. There is also a fee of $75 per credit hour to transcript IB credit (no fee if you do not earn a high enough score for credit). This means a typical 3 credit hour class earned though AP credit will cost $225 in transcript fees.

    Exam Have Completed Score Will Complete