Art Major

artThe art program at William Woods University is designed to provide you with an open, attractive environment in which to explore personal expression and develop strong technical and artistic skills. The program emphasizes technique and creativity, complemented by a student-selected concentration in studio art, photography or art education. Our studio-based programs offer adynamic opportunity to work closely with active art professionals and to exhibit your work. In addition to basic courses in drawing, painting and design, you can explore print making, bronze casting, sculpture, ceramics, art history, jewelry, computer design, 3-D design, color theory and watercolor.

Portfolio development and professional preparation also play key roles in the studio art curriculum. An annual portfolio review and the opportunity to critique fellow students' works culminate with a senior exhibition in the university’s gallery, highlighting your artistic development. As an art major, you can receive a bachelor of art, bachelor of fine art or a bachelor of science degree.

Bachelor of Science

The Bachelor of Science in Art Education comprises 40 credits. This degree does not require a minor.

Education Requirements

Concentrations

Art Education

Students who plan to teach Art in grades K-12 in Missouri complete this sequence of courses and the Secondary Certification sequence (45 hours).

Students interested in becoming certified to teach in other states need to follow these program requirements and be recommended for Missouri certification by the Registrar. They may then take that certification to other states. Policies vary among states.

Information on the curriculum, policies and requirements of the university’s Teacher Education Program and of its teacher certification process is available in the Teacher Education Program handbook. The handbook is posted on the Education program’s website.

Introduction to Teacher Education (EDU 105) is recommended for students in this certification.

Bachelor of Arts

The Bachelor of Arts in Photography or Studio Art comprises 40 credits, requires a minor and a year of college level foreign language. Majors associated with the bachelor of arts are most appropriate to students seeking a liberal-learning, pre-professional or graduate school orientation.

Concentrations

Photography

The photography concentration option under the art major offers students an opportunity to do in-depth study in the theory, history and methods of photography. The course of study emphasizes the technical aspects of imaging, the techniques involved and the aesthetic considerations of creative photography.

Studio Art

The studio art concentration at William Woods University provides both majors and minors with a solid foundation in processes and techniques necessary to appreciate, produce and understand the arts in historical and cultural contexts.

A distinctive aspect of the instructional process is the faculty-directed gallery events. This method of instruction encourages students to develop cultural and communication skills strengthened by the first-hand exposure to monthly art gallery events.

In the studio courses the criteria for students to demonstrate an understanding of art elements and design principles is supported by displays of successful work in the corridor galleries. Another dimension of the curriculum includes a commitment to academic service-learning in several of the art courses to connect student artists with the community at large.

Bachelor of Fine Arts

The Bachelor of Fine Arts in Studio Art comprises 70 credits. It does not require a minor.

Concentrations

Studio Art

The studio art concentration at William Woods University provides both majors and minors with a solid foundation in processes and techniques necessary to appreciate, produce and understand the arts in historical and cultural contexts.

A distinctive aspect of the instructional process is the faculty-directed gallery events. This method of instruction encourages students to develop cultural and communication skills strengthened by the first-hand exposure to monthly art gallery events.

In the studio courses the criteria for students to demonstrate an understanding of art elements and design principles is supported by displays of successful work in the corridor galleries. Another dimension of the curriculum includes a commitment to academic service-learning in several of the art courses to connect student artists with the community at large.

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